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What's with destination charges?

We hear that new vehicle price differences between Canada and the U.S. are narrowing because of the stronger Canadian dollar. So why is there such a large difference between the countries in the destination charge on identical vehicles?

  • Choosing a car at dealership. Thoughtful grey hair man in formalwear leaning at the car and looking away

We hear that new vehicle price differences between Canada and the U.S. are narrowing because of the stronger Canadian dollar. So why is there such a large difference between the countries in the destination charge on identical vehicles?

I know the old argument to support destination charges: the manufacturers take the actual total cost to ship all the vehicles and divide it by the number of vehicles shipped; the resulting number becomes the charge per vehicle.

But is this calculation ever audited? I submit two cases that show this discrepancy between the two countries, just vehicles chosen at random and researched on their Canadian and U.S. websites.

Ford Edge: Made in Canada! Destination fee from Oakville to a dealer in Oakville is $1,400 (Canadian); destination fee from Oakville to San Diego $775 (U.S.).

Acura MDX: Destination fee to a dealer in Canada, $1,895 (Canadian); destination fee to a dealer in the U.S.A., $810 (U.S.).

Are Canadians just being gouged here? These outrageous charges are one of the main reasons that I never buy new vehicles.

Jack Medlock, Toronto

Disappearing lanes

can cause traffic chaos

 

It's easy to read about poor highway design, but when it happens to you, it's different.

Eastbound out of Omemee ( north of Peterborough on Hwy. 7 ), there is a steep hill with a disappearing right lane at the crest.

We were the lead car in the right lane with a transport tailgating us up the hill, well above the speed limit. The trouble was, the stream of traffic in the left lane was pacing the transport and had no place to go when the driver simply moved over.

We were glad we were ahead of the chaos of the blaring diesel horn and scattering small cars.

Clearly, the fast-lane traffic was not aware that the slow lane ended with the transport blocking the signage. Wheels certainly has a point illuminating this issue.

Mark Steele, Peterborough

Write to wheels@thestar.ca or mail

to Your View, Wheels, Toronto Star,

One Yonge St., Toronto, Ont. M5E 1E6.

Please include your full name, address and telephone number.

 


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