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Insider Report: Groom arrives in curious style at redneck wedding

Published October 11, 2013

I’ve shared video of a wedding at a race track and I’ve even heard of a bride arriving at her wedding in a helicopter. But this is the first time I’ve heard of anyone attempting to fly in to their wedding aboard a monster truck. The story goes that the best man was driving his own “mud truck” with the groom as a passenger. The engine kill switch was accidentally flipped just before lift-off, causing the truck to lose speed and ultimately crash.

It’s pretty amateur stuff with lots of empty shots of bare lawn — and, sadly, the party goer who shot this cellphone video has not, like so many other people, seen the Vertical Video Syndrome PSA, but when the groom finally “arrives” in style, the chorus of chortling and “Atta boy” praise makes it worth the watch.

The Garage Guy drives: 2014 Mazda3
A week and a half ago I was in British Columbia for the launch of the 2014 Mazda3. The car is super important for Mazda and I was excited to see if the car lives up to the brand’s Zoom Zoom tagline.

ChumpCar racing comes to Ontario
This weekend marks the first time the world of crapcan racing makes a stop at the Mosport circuit at Canadian Tire Motorsport Park. The premiere series of the genre, ChumpCar will be at CTMP on Saturday and Sunday. The series features affordable street cars that have been turned into budget race cars, doing battle at speed just like the big leagues. The difference is that competitors are more likely to be normal car enthusiasts who have got the racing bug. That is not to say that there isn’t any pros on hand. Local ALMS star Kyle Marcelli has expressed an interest in racing this weekend and who knows what other talents will be on hand to try to keep him from winning.

After checking out this video from earlier this year at Daytona, head over to the ChumpCar site to learn more.

Watch a 1927 Miller 91 race car being built with a 3D printer
The was a time when car parts (and just about everything else for that matter) had to be crafted by hand. A car would start as an idea, then perhaps a few sketches before raw materials were bent, ground, machined and welded into parts that were then assembled. The rapidly growing technology of 3D printing is making its mark on all sorts of production, including automotive manufacturing. The folks at a company called CIDEAS decided to create a showpiece that would display the four different types of 3D printing they offer. Using 3D CAD sketches which were fed into a computer, they have created a 40% scale 1927 Miller 91 race car, even making the effort to have parts chromed where they would have been chrome. This is simply incredible.

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