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INSIDER REPORT: Ferrari 250 GTO crash might be the most expensive one ever

Published July 12, 2012

The internet has been buzzing over the past few days about a crash in France, involving one of only 39 Ferrari 250 GTOs built. Long considered one of the most desirable cars ever built, one changed hands earlier this year for a reported $35 Million U.S. American collector, Christopher Cox was at the wheel of his GTO in France, on his way to the Le Mans Classic. Cox was apparently making a left turn, when one of the cars following it decided to pass. Reports say that both Cox and his Wife, along with two other individuals who were in the other car, have sustained various injuries.

Although hard numbers have not been revealed yet, some reporters are suggesting that it may be the most expensive damage ever to be done to a single car. Given the irreplaceable nature of the car, we can assume that it will indeed be be repaired.

Dallas bus driver fired after slamming in to line of stopped cars

Over the past couple of years, the TTC has had its share of problems with inattentive employees being caught on camera, but none of those incidents come close to a recent lapse of attention in Texas. On June 29, a Dallas area paratransit van driver failed to stop as he approached a line of cars that were stopped on an exit ramp. Five vehicles were damaged and two occupants of those drivers received non life threatening injuries. Fortunately, there were no passengers aboard the bus at the time.

The DART system is operated by Veolia, the some company that operates the VIVA buses in York Region. The driver had 11 years of clean driving service, but has been relieved of his duties by Veolia. Drugs and alcohol have been ruled out as possible causes and Veolia has released the following video that shows that the driver was not using his phone. According to Dallas News, the accident is still under investigation.

Watch a racing driver re-attach his steering wheel at speed

Quick release steering wheels are a necessity in certain types of race car, where space limits the amount of mobility when entering and exiting the car. The problem is that the are, well, removable! Like any other product, some are better than others. Alex von Ehrheim found this out the hard way when he saved a few bucks by buying one off eBay. He had just made a pass for second place at Britain’s Donington circuit when the steering wheel came off in his hands. A remarkably calm and collected von Ehrheim re-installed the tiller before anything untoward happened.

Only original once

As humans, we have an inset attachment to our history and often want to surround ourselves with articles from the past. Somehow though, we also like new stuff and we have a tendency to over restore things to the point that they are actually better than they were originally. Nowhere is this more evident than the car hobby, where too many folks restore cars to the point where there is no possible way they could have been that good when they were first built. Fortunately, thanks largely to the whole “rat rod” movement, many people are beginning to realize that original is better. This is a story about originality.

Bill Akin owns a 1970 dirt sprint car that was originally built by USAC racing legend, Bernie Cedoz. The Toledo service station turned high school shop class teacher had a successful career as a driver before becoming a team owner in the Seventies. Rules changes made the car obsolete in ’72 and the driver/owner put the car in a shed. When he passed away, his son sold the car to Akin, who did a mild mechanical only restoration, doing just enough to make the car run and be safe. In other words, Akin preserved the history of the car by keeping it original, because it can only be original once! Legendary speed parts manufacturer, Holley, caught up with Akin at the annual Holley Hot Rod Reunion and captured the excellent video below.

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