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Insider Report: Cheese inferno shuts tunnel in Norway for 6 days

Published January 28, 2013

While drivers in the GTA are reeling from Friday’s massive 80 car pile up east of Toronto, drivers in Norway had to deal with a road closure of a different sort. A tunnel near Narvik was closed for days due to a cheese inferno.

The cargo of brunost, which is a caramelized Norwegian goat cheese, somehow caught fire in the tunnel. In an interview with Reuters, police officer Viggo Berg said “This high concentration of fat and sugar is almost like petrol if it gets hot enough.” Taking the concept of cheese fondue to a whole new level, 27 metric tons of the brown cheese burned for four days and the tunnel was closed for six days. There is no word as to what caused the cheese to catch fire.

Check out a bystander’s video.

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