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Hyundai finds 77 percent of Canadians prefer Hydrogen Fuel Cell

Hyundai Auto Canada Corp. (HACC) has uncovered a strong appetite among Canadians for hydrogen fuel cell electric and non-gasoline powered vehicles, showing that it is time for a change in the auto industry.

  • Canada favours fuel cells

Hyundai Auto Canada Corp. (HACC) has uncovered a strong appetite among Canadians for hydrogen fuel cell electric and non-gasoline powered vehicles, showing that it is time for a change in the auto industry.

The findings were obtained through a two-pronged research study in partnership with Canadian research company Ipsos Reid and Offsetters, North America’s leading carbon management company. Both focused exclusively on the Canadian market.

The consumer insight survey revealed the majority of Canadians (75 per cent) would like to drive a vehicle not powered by gasoline – but they aren’t keen to turn to traditional battery electric vehicles (BEVs), with 71 per cent of those surveyed indicating that constantly having to charge a BEV is a pain and 67 per cent feeling they are too much of a hassle to drive.

This may indicate why 64 per cent demonstrated an appetite to drive a vehicle powered by hydrogen and 77 per cent believe hydrogen fuel cell powered vehicles are the way of the future.

In January 2015, Hyundai became the first automotive company to offer hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles to the Canadian public.

RELATED: Can fuel-cell cars take on the electrics?

The Hyundai Tucson Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) is available to Canadians on a three-year lease in the Vancouver area.

The Tucson FCEV takes less than five minutes to refuel and has an estimated range of over 420 km, eliminating the range anxiety and long recharge time of BEVs.

Given that prices for gasoline have fluctuated wildly over the last year, eco-friendly vehicles might appear less relevant on the surface.

But, the Ipsos Reid survey revealed that 74 per cent of Canadians still see a major benefit in the fuel cell vehicles not being reliant on highly volatile fuel prices.

More significantly, an even higher proportion (82 per cent) thinks that producing no greenhouse gas emissions is a major benefit of fuel cell vehicles.

In other words, a large portion of Canadian consumers also seem to be concerned with their vehicle’s tailpipe emissions.

RELATED: The Difference Between Hybrids, Fuel Cell, and Electric Cars 

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